Muslims and Jews in Iowa ‘break bread’ together for Passover

“The more we've gotten to know each other and to know each other's belief systems we've found there are more commonalities than there are differences," said Jewish cantor Gail Karp.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
April 4, 2019 14:25
Report on Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom

Report on Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom. (photo credit: screenshot)

 
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Jewish and Muslim women came together earlier this week in an unlikely place: Bettendorf, Iowa. The group celebrated the Jewish holiday of Passover at the Quad Cities Muslim Center. Passover begins on April 19.

According to a report broadcast by KWQC News, the women are part of an organization called “Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom,” an interfaith group that spends time together and learns about each other’s faiths and traditions. The women say that the more they do together, the more they similarities in their religious cultures. 

“The more we've gotten to know each other and to know each other's belief systems we've found there are more commonalities than there are differences," said Jewish cantor Gail Karp. 

Salaam and shalom both mean peace.
Lisa Killinger, president of the Muslim community of the Quad Cities told KWQC, "We’ve found in our community that women often build bridges better than men. There’s [something] very deep and special and very powerful when women get together with women.”

The message, said the women, is that by breaking bread together there’s no place for hate.

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