Survey: 27% of European Jews say they feel unsafe

More than half of the 1,361 respondents said that they felt unsafe wearing a kippa in Europe.

By JTA
January 22, 2018 07:24
1 minute read.
jewish germany berlin

A man wearing a kippa waits for the start of an anti-Semitism demo at Berlin's Brandenburg Gate September 14, 2014. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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In a survey conducted online among hundreds of respondents who identified as Jews, 27 percent of Europeans and 11 percent of Americans said they felt unsafe.

In the World Zionist Organization survey released Friday, which was conducted last year among a total of 1,361 respondents, 51 percent of those in Europe said that wearing Jewish symbols in public made them feel unsafe. In North America, that figure was 22 percent.

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A press statement by WZO about the survey said it was conducted among Jews not living in Israel but it did not say how many of the 1,361 respondents were from Europe, North America and beyond. The statement also did not specify which countries in Europe the respondents on that continent came from.

Nearly one third of European respondents said they had experienced or witnessed an antisemitic event featuring vandalism, compared to 11 percent worldwide.

Worldwide, most respondents who said they had experienced an antisemitic incident also indicated that they did not report it to police. Six percent said they did not report the alleged incident out of fear for their security. Thirty percent said they did not want “to make a big deal of it” and 42 percent said they lacked faith in authorities to act on their complaint.

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