Report: Iran claims computers no longer infected by Stuxnet

According to an Iranian Press TV report, Teheran has successfully "cleaned" all the computers infected by the computer worm, says reactor site was not affected.

By JPOST.COM STAFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
October 3, 2010 19:34
1 minute read.
The majority of Middle East internet users are highly educated

Computer. (photo credit: Courtesy)

The Iranian computers controlling important infrastructure in the Islamic Republic that were discovered to be infected by the Stuxnet worm have been cleaned of the malware, Iranian Press TV reported on Sunday.

"This virus activates in industrial industrial computers with SCADA platforms designed by a particular company, and all [infected] platforms have been scanned, cleaned, and sent back to respective industries," deputy industry minister for technology Mohsen Hatam was quoted as saying by Press TV.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Teheran also sought to quash rumors that the malware had been designed to sabotage Iran's first nuclear reactor at Bushehr before it comes online, denying that any of the reactors computers had been infected with the Stuxnet code.

On Saturday, Iran's intelligence minister said the country had learned how to fight off the complex computer worm.

Heidar Moslehi was also quoted as saying authorities have arrested several nuclear spies, but he gave no details and it wasn't clear if the developments were related.

Over recent months, the malicious Stuxnet computer code has also affected industrial systems in India, Indonesia and the US. But it has spread the most in Iran, including to several personal computers of workers at Iran's first nuclear power plant, which is to go online later this year.

The destructive Stuxnet worm has surprised experts because it is the first one specifically created to take over industrial control systems, like those at power plants, rather than just steal or manipulate data.


Related Content

Bushehr nuclear Iranian
August 5, 2014
Iran and the bomb: The future of negotiations

By YONAH JEREMY BOB