Likud and Labor apps pose major security risks - report

Likud fixed the breach as soon as the company informed the party of it, Mako reported. A Labor spokesperson told the site that Check Point's claim "is not true."

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March 28, 2019 16:17
1 minute read.
Cyber hacking

Cyber hacking (illustrative). (photo credit: INGIMAGE)

 
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Both the Likud and Labor parties are using applications that are at risk of major security breaches, according to an inspection by Check Point Software Technologies.

On Wednesday, the Hebrew site Mako reported that, for example, the Likud app gives users the means to get personal information on party members using just an ID number. The Labor app uses the contact information on a user's mobile phone to map his or her family members. Check Point noted these challenges to the parties, according to the report.
Likud fixed the breach as soon as the company informed the party of it, Mako reported. A Labor spokesperson told the site that Check Point's claim "is not true."

Currently, only three political parties offer users access to an app to learn more about their plans should they be chosen to rule the country: Likud, Labor and Yashar. 

Yashar is a new party headed by Dr. Yuval Karniel, a web researcher and an activist on freedom of speech issues. Yashar calls for the incorporation of online tools to better engage the Israeli public in the democratic system.


The party's app is not yet live, according to the report, therefore Check Point did not comment on it with regards to potential security breaches.




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