Accessible culture for people with disabilities propels Equinote mission

Equinote is going to work with educational, cultural and accessible bodies to produce accessible performances, master classes, workshops and activities for people living with disabilities.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
October 23, 2018 22:55
1 minute read.
Accessible culture for people with disabilities propels Equinote mission

Disability inclusion in Israel by White Animation. (photo credit: WHITE ANIMATION)

 
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Equinote, a new organization aiming to bring culture and music to people with disabilities, is opening its doors this month with a series of shows at the Nalaga’at Center and at Tzavta, both in Tel Aviv.

Founded by husband-wife team of Rinat Avisar (former CEO of the Israel Chamber Orchestra) and strategic consultant and musician Yoram Lachish (parents of two hearing disabled children), Equinote is going to work with educational, cultural and accessible bodies to produce accessible performances, master classes, workshops and activities for people living with physical and/or mental disabilities.

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Three diverse concerts are being presented by Equinote that emphasize their mission. First is Misa Criolla For All at the Nalaga’at Center on October 28. The popular piece, composed by Ariel Ramirez, will be performed by the Latino-Americano ensemble of Natan Formansky and the Tel Aviv Collegium singers, led by Yishai Steckler and Yonit Shaked-Golan. The show will be in complete darkness, providing a rare opportunity to experience the music as do those who cannot see.

Next up is Touching the Sounds with Beethoven on October 29 at the same venue. The winner of the Accessible Israel 2018 award, the musical play for hearing-impaired children is inspired by Beethoven’s life story: Despite his deafness, he continued to compose masterpieces. The show utilizes a new accessible way of experiencing music – via sight and touch, using Cymatics-based technology (the science of sound waves’ effect on matter).

The opening winds up on October 30 with Autista: Daniel Amit at Tzavta. Amit, a singer, guitarist, pianist, songwriter and comic artist, who has been diagnosed with high-functioning autism, tells his story, shares his fears and dreams, while reading, showcasing his comedy, and playing and singing covers as well as original songs.

For tickets: Equinote, 077-616-1618, https://tickets.equinote.org.il

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