IN PICTURES: Primates prepare for Passover at Ramat Gan Zoo

The Ramat Gan Safari Park gets ready for the upcoming holiday.

By
March 28, 2018 11:56
1 minute read.
 An orangutan eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Passover

An orangutan eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv. (photo credit: JACK GUEZ / AFP)

Several primates were spotted on Tuesday eating the traditional matza (unleavened bread) as the Ramat Gan Safari Park, a zoo near Tel Aviv, was getting ready for the upcoming holiday.

Year after year, the zoo keepers put their animals on a kosher diet in preparation for Passover, a holiday when they are not allowed to touch or own leavened products.

During the eight-day holiday, Religious Jews all over the world eat matza, a special unleavened bread, in order to commemorate the Israelites' exodus from Egypt. When the Jews left slavery, they were in such a hurry, that the bread they had prepared for the journey did not have time to rise.

A chimpanzee eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv (Amir Cohen/REUTERS)

Lemurs eat the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv (Jack Guez/AFP)



A gorilla eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv (Jack Guez/AFP)

A lemur eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv (Jack Guez/AFP)

An orangutan eats the traditional Matza (unleavened bread) in preparation for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv (Jack Guez/AFP)

The traditional Tel Aviv Passover diet consists of more than just matza. The carnivore members of the zoo are treated with a special meal of gefilte fish in honor of the holiday.

A Syrian brown bear eats the traditional gefilte fish in preparation for the Jewish holiday of Passover, at the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv in 2009 (Amir Cohen/REUTERS)


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