From Bronze Age to First Temple: Archaeological site set to open in Hebron

"We are happy and excited to unveil another piece of Jewish history and to make it accessible to the general public."

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October 17, 2018 03:09
1 minute read.
From Bronze Age to First Temple: Archaeological site set to open in Hebron

Tel Hebron. (photo credit: ISRAELI CIVIL ADMINISTRATION SPOKESPERSON)

 
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The Jewish community in Hebron celebrated the opening of a new archaeological park in the biblical city’s Tel Rumeida neighborhood on Tuesday. It includes excavated artifacts from the Bronze Age to the early Roman and First Temple periods.

The site’s opening follows extensive conservation work carried out by the Civil Administration’s archeology unit, in collaboration with Ariel University.

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During the course of the excavations conducted during the past year, the walls of the city from the Early and Middle Bronze Age were excavated at the site, as well as buildings from the Early Roman period, including pottery vessels, jewelry and coins. In addition, the excavations uncovered workshops from the First Temple period, including wine and olive presses, pottery kilns and huge vessels for the production of wine and oil.

Other findings include a four-chambered house; jars bearing ancient Hebrew inscriptions with the words “to the king of Hebron”; and a section of the city wall.

“We are happy and excited to unveil another piece of Jewish history and to make it accessible to the general public,” said Civil Administration head Brig.-Gen. Achvat Ben-Hur. “The Israeli Civil Administration has been working for a year to excavate the findings and to open an archaeological site that will attract new audiences to Judea and Samaria.”


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