Israeli shepherdess uses modern sheep breed to revive ancient shofar sound

Turning her flock's horns into shofars is part of God's plan, says Lewinsky, who calls herself a "traditional and God-fearing Jew."

By REUTERS
March 7, 2018 07:29
1 minute read.
Israeli shepherdess uses modern sheep breed to revive ancient shofar sound

Jacob sheep stand in their barn in Ramot Naftali, Israel, February 21, 2018.. (photo credit: REUTERS/AMIR COHEN)

 
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RAMOT NAFTALI, Israel - The piercing note of a shofar - a ram's horn used in Jewish religious ceremonies - cuts through the mountain air of the Galilee.

Here in northern Israel, shepherdess Jenna Lewinsky is raising a flock of Jacob Sheep, pictured here, as a religious calling.

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With anything up to six horns on each animal, the breed is ideally suited for the manufacture of the horn traditionally blown during the Jewish New Year and the Day of Atonement, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar.

The spotted breed of Jacob Sheep was bred in England in the 17th and 18th centuries, and this flock was brought to Israel from Canada by Lewinsky in 2016.

Shepherdess Jenna Lewinsky holds a lamb from the Jacob sheep breed, in Ramot Naftali, Israel, February 21, 2018. (Reuters/Amir Cohen)

But sheep have been recorded since antiquity across the Middle East, and the modern breed's name echoes the ancient Biblical story from Genesis in which the patriarch Jacob took "every speckled and spotted sheep" as wages from his father-in-law, Laban.

Turning her flock's horns into shofars is part of God's plan, says Lewinsky, who calls herself a "traditional and God-fearing Jew."



"The Jacob Sheep horns can probably be processed anywhere in the world but what makes the horns special is that we are processing them in Israel, which gives them a holiness," she said.

Robert Weinger, a shofar-maker who works with the horns from Lewinsky's farm, said that a ram's horn made from the breed can sell for $500 to $20,000 or more, depending on its sound quality, as it produces a wider range of musical notes than other shofars.

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