Zionist Union trolls Netanyahu with billboard on Tel Aviv’s main highway

“A prime minister who is up to his neck with investigations does not have a public and moral mandate to make decisions on important matters… The right thing to do is for this government to go home.”

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February 15, 2018 09:58
1 minute read.
A giant billboard showing a quote by Benjamin Netanyahu speaking out against corrupt politicians

A giant billboard showing a quote by Benjamin Netanyahu speaking out against corrupt politicians. (photo credit: Courtesy)

Zionist Union mocked Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with a billboard on the Ayalon Highway quoting him saying a premier cannot serve while under investigation.

The thousand-meter-area billboard went up on Tel Aviv’s main highway on Thursday, two days after the police announced they found enough evidence to indict Netanyahu for bribery and fraud.

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The sign features something Netanyahu said when Ehud Olmert was prime minister, and was embroiled in corruption investigations, eventually going to prison.

“A prime minister who is up to his neck with investigations does not have a public and moral mandate to decide fateful matters... The right thing to do is for this government to go home,” the billboard reads, followed by “Netanyahu, 2008.”

Then-Labor Party leader Ehud Barak pressured Olmert to quit, and an election was held in 2009, after which Netanyahu became prime minister for the second time.

Zionist Union leader Avi Gabbay said “Netanyahu cannot run away from responsibility and cannot hide from the shame.”

“The police recommendations are serious, and Netanyahu lost his mandate to lead Israel,” he added. “Millions of drivers who will pass the sign every day want Netanyahu to resign and for Israel to be a country clean of corruption once again, and for it to have new, honest leadership at its helm.”


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