The sound of torture

An Israeli filmmaker documents the horrifying saga of Eritrean refugees held for ransom in Bedouin torture houses in Sinai.

By
April 29, 2014 15:26
hostage

A former hostage is overcome with grief as she recalls her ordeal in the documentary ‘Sound of Torture'. (photo credit: COURTESY KEREN SHAYO / SOUND OF TORTURE)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

 WHEN MERON Estefanos arrives outside a cluster of Bedouin houses in the Sinai desert, she knows that in the basements of the wellbuilt two-story buildings kidnapped Eritrean refugees are chained to the ground. She has spoken to them on the phone and heard the men scream while being tortured with burning coals. She has heard the women weep over being repeatedly raped. And from talking to the kidnappers themselves, she knows that they will kill these hostages, as they have done to others in the past, unless they are paid a $25,000 ransom fee or more for each hostage.

Disguised as a Bedouin woman, Estefanos is wearing a black robe with a niqab covering her face. Were this a Hollywood movie, she undoubtedly would find a way to burst into the premises and rescue the hostages.

Read More...

Related Content