Swedish ‘kippah walk’ unites Jews, non-Jews

Several hundred march Stokholm in solidarity with Malmo's persecuted Jewish community, said to be "regularly harassed."

By JTA, JPOST.COM STAFF
August 19, 2012 10:48
1 minute read.
Photo illustrative

Suedeantisem. (photo credit: Reuters)

 
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Several hundred Kippah-wearing Jews and non-Jews marched in Sweden as a sign of solidarity with Malmo’s Jews on Saturday. The march passed without incident.

“The idea is to show ourselves and others that we refuse to be afraid or hide our Jewish affiliation,” Fredrik Sieradzki, director of communications for the Jewish community of Malmo, told JTA ahead of the march.

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Earlier this year, a rabbi from Malmo was physically assaulted.

In 2010, Malmo’s mayor, Ilmar Reepalu, said that a group of Jews in Malmo who were attacked by Swedish Muslims during a peaceful protest in support of Israel brought the violence upon themselves for not distancing themselves from Israel and its actions during the month-long Gaza War in 2008-09.

The first walk began in Malmo in January when members of the local synagogue decided to keep on their kippot upon exiting their synagogue. Reports about the march on Facebook helped draw more marchers in. The walk on Saturday is the fourth such event in Malmo, a city with a population of approximately 1,800 Jews.

It was be the first time that a kippah walk is organized by Stokholm’s much larger Jewish community.

On Friday, the newspaper Sydsvenskan ran an op-ed by Sweden’s minister for European Affairs, Brigitta Ohlsson, in praise of the kippah walk.



Sieradzki wrote that members of the community were being regularly harassed “predominantly but not exclusively” by young members of Malmo’s large population of residents of Muslim or Middle Eastern background. Anti-Semitic incidents involving members of the community who are visibly Jewish can occur on a daily basis, he said.

“The statement is that Jews should be free to walk in Malmo without fear, and that is sadly not the case right now,” Lena Posner-Korosi, president of the Council of Swedish Jewish Communities, told JTA. “Many Jews are frightened to show their affiliation. We in Stockholm are having a kippah march in solidarity with the Malmo community, but for our own sake as well. It`s a signal which says, `We are here, we don’t harm you so don’t harm us.’”

Anti-Semitism in Malmo first drew international attention in 2009, when riots broke out due to the presence of Israeli tennis players in the city, which hosted the Wimbledon Cup.

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