The ‘interesting’ Meg Wolitzer

An author lives up to her book’s title; "Growing up Jewish is in me, in many ways that probably come out more subtly than in other writers."

By BETH KISSILEFF
August 1, 2013 15:11
The author draws many analogies between summer camp and later-life situations.

Little boy chefs 521. (photo credit: Reuters)

 
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‘You may hear cooking noises in the background,” warns New York City-based novelist Meg Wolitzer before our interview.

Wolitzer, whose ninth and most recent novel, The Interestings, is based around a group of six friends who meet at an arts camp, is a funny and engaging conversationalist, and the cooking noises set a casual and warm tone for our discussions. In addition to talking about the Jewish identity of the author and her characters, we manage to touch on VIDA counts (how many books by female authors are reviewed and how many female reviewers are writing them), literary envy, and the Jewish and Israeli writers who have influenced her work.

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