10 reasons to be an Israeli prosecutor

By ABIGAIL KLEIN
August 26, 2010 16:27
1 minute read.

 
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10) Potential defendants can be held in jail for up to 15 days prior to arrest for the purposes of investigative detention.

9) Israeli prosecutors with a child under the age of eight are permitted to work one hour less a day.

8) Israeli prosecutors get 40 days’ vacation per year plus additional days for rejuvenation.

7) Israeli prosecutors are granted tenure after five years of employment.

6) When on trial, defendants who are in custody sit in a box behind Plexiglas, away from their attorney. Defendants who are not in custody sit behind their attorney, not at counsel table.

5) Defendants must reveal their notice of alibi at the time of their first appearance or be barred from using alibi defense absent permission from a judge.


4) During trial, Israeli prosecutors may comment on defendant’s post-arrest silence and defendant’s election not to testify.

3) Israeli prosecutors get paid overtime: up to 50 hours/month without approval; over 50 hours/month with approval of a supervisor.



Bonus: prosecutors can earn overtime even if working from home.

2) Israeli prosecutors can dress down in the office, in magistrate’s court. Plus, they get clothing allowance.

1) Israeli prosecutors can appeal acquittals and lenient sentences.

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