Passionate about preserving

Salt-fermented vegetables add flavor, texture and color to cuisines around the world.

By FAYE LEVY, YAKIR LEVY
May 7, 2015 17:08
Kimchi recipe

Mixture for making cabbage kimchi.. (photo credit: YAKIR LEVY)

 
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‘There would be no civilization without food preservation,” said master preserver Ernest Miller, at the class he taught at Melissa’s Produce in Los Angeles. In our earliest examples of writing, noted Miller, what people wrote about was preserved foods – in contracts, inventories and trade agreements.

The subject of Miller’s class was lacto-fermentation, or using salt to ferment food. The salt helps inhibit the growth of undesirable bacteria and creates a favorable environment for lactobacilli, the good bacteria. This process not only enables the vegetables to last for months in the refrigerator or in a root cellar, but also turns them into relishes for sandwiches, salads and other dishes.

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