The unlikeliest storyteller

‘We didn’t know anyone Jewish while we were growing up.’

By STEPHANIE GRANOT
March 2, 2017 18:26
Pyramids

Moon landscape pencil on paper, as painted by 14-year-old Jewish prisoner Petr Ginz (1928-1944) in Terezin Ghetto in 1942. He died in Auschwitz two years later. (photo credit: COLLECTION OF THE YAD VASHEM ART MUSEUM/JERUSALEM GIFT OF OTTO GINZ/HAIFA)

 
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The first time he mentioned that his sister-in-law writes a blog on Terezin it didn’t register with me.

“That’s nice,” I replied absently to the builder with the tattooed shoulders and the big silver cross. He shrugged and turned a power saw on. April sunlight glinted off the cross around his neck as he got back to building a deck in our yard.

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