Egyptian application notifies locals about bombs in their cities

“It seems bombs have become a daily routine to the extent that they have a special hashtag now,” tweeted one user.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
February 3, 2015 10:22
A bus burns where a car bomb exploded at Beit Lid junction near Netanya, September 9, 2001

A bus burns where a car bomb exploded at Beit Lid junction near Netanya, September 9, 2001. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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An application notifying you about the location of potential bombs has made waves in Egypt's social media scene, the Egypt Indepedent quoted Al-Masry Al-Youm on Sunday as saying

"Beyolak" was launched in 2010 by 5 Egyptian tech upstarts as an application meant to warn commuters about bad traffic conditions, but rapidly became a tool used to spread the word on the presence of possible explosives since violence began escalating in recent months.

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In one instance, the app was used to notify locals about a bomb found in a public transportation station in Alexandria, that a Metro Line was delayed because of a similar device and that trains en route from Cairo were stopped because of a suspicious object found in a tunnel.

“It seems bombs have become a daily routine to the extent that they have a special hashtag now,” tweeted one user.


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