Lebanon to consider legalizing cannabis growing

The move comes as an attempt to boost the struggling economy.

By REUTERS
July 18, 2018 20:27
1 minute read.
cannabis weed marijuana medical plant pot joint

cannabis background macro close up. (photo credit: INGIMAGE)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later



BEIRUT - Lebanon's parliament is considering legalizing the cultivation of cannabis for medical purposes, Parliament Speaker Nabih Berri said on Wednesday, in an attempt to boost the struggling economy.



Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"The Lebanese Parliament is preparing to study and adopt the legislation necessary to legislate the cultivation of cannabis and its manufacture for medical uses in the manner of many European countries and some US states," Berri's office said, reporting comments made in a meeting with the US ambassador to Beirut.



Although growing the plant is illegal in Lebanon, powerful landowners nevertheless have for decades openly grown fields of cannabis in the fertile Bekaa Valley, untouched by law enforcement and its attempts to crack down.



The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime ranked Lebanon in a 2018 report as the world's third main source of cannabis resin seized by national authorities after Morocco and Afghanistan.


A Related Video You May Like:
 
Hemp products now kosher, thanks to Kentucky company



Lebanon has been suffering weak growth since 2011, hit by regional turmoil. The IMF has estimated growth rates of 1-1.5 percent in 2017 and 2018, saying traditional drivers of the economy - construction and real estate - remain subdued.



The IMF has also called for "an immediate and substantial" fiscal adjustment to improve the sustainability of public debt, which stood at more than 150 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) at the end of 2017.



To help transform the economy, Lebanon this year engaged consultancy firm McKinsey to come up with a plan for productive sectors.

One of the options explored by the report was for Lebanon to legalize cannabis cultivation for export for medical use, a government source told Reuters. The report has not yet been made public and is awaiting government approval.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

 A demonstrator holds a poster with a picture of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi outside the Saudi
December 13, 2018
Is the Khashoggi affair spotlighting Israel?

By SETH J. FRANTZMAN