Massive archaeological discovery near Egypt's Valley of the Kings

Egyptian archaeologists unearthed the tomb of the nobleman from more than 3,000 years ago, the latest in a series of major discoveries of ancient relics.

By REUTERS, JPOST.COM STAFF
April 20, 2017 10:45
1 minute read.

Egyptian archaeologists unveil discoveries in Luxor (credit: REUTERS)

Egyptian archaeologists unveil discoveries in Luxor (credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Egypt unveiled a massive granite statue of Ramses II on Tuesday after finishing its restoration.

When discovered between 1958 and 1960, the destroyed statue of Ramses II was in 57 pieces, but it wasn't until November 2016 that the restoration process began.

Standing at 11 meters tall and weighing about 75 tons, the statue was unveiled at Luxor Temple hours after the unveiling of the discovery of Userhat's tomb.



Egyptian archaeologists unearthed the tomb of the nobleman from more than 3,000 years ago, the latest in a series of major discoveries of ancient relics that Egypt hopes will revive a tourist business that has been hit by political instability.

The tomb consists of an open court leading into a rectangular hall, a corridor and inner chamber, the Ministry of Antiquities said on Tuesday. It dates from the 18th Dynasty, and was discovered in the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis near the Valley of the Kings. The nobleman, Userhat, was a judge in the city, Al Jazeera reported from an Egyptian antiquities ministry statement.


More than 1,000 small carved ushtabi figurines were also discovered, which were placed in tombs to help the deceased with duties in the afterlife.

There is reason to believe yet more artifacts will be found in the tomb in the future.



 

Related Content

A military vehicle carrying Iranian Zoobin smart bomb (L) and Sagheb missile under pictures of Iran'
June 16, 2019
Iran to declare less compliance with nuclear pact

By HERB KEINON, REUTERS

Cookie Settings