Rouhani promises wage increase for public servants amid protests

The announcement was unexpected as earlier this month the Iranian government said it was unsure about whether or not salaries would be raised.

By
March 20, 2019 13:40
1 minute read.
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is seen during a public speech in the southern Hormozgan province

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is seen during a public speech in the southern Hormozgan province, Iran, February 17, 2019. (photo credit: IRANIAN PRESIDENCY WEBSITE/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani has promised to increase the salaries of public servants in the country with the start of the Persian calendar on Thursday.

According to Radio Farda, the announcement was unexpected, as earlier this month the Iranian government said it was unsure about whether or not salaries would be raised because "raising salaries and wages is a decision made by the parliament and the government does not have the authority to dismiss the legislature’s decision.” 
Rouhani announced that they would be raising the minimum monthly wage from the equivalent of NIS 325 to NIS 505. The cost of living per month for the average Iranian family is equivalent to about NIS 1,010, which means if there is only one breadwinner in the family, they will still be short another NIS 505 just to cover their basic needs, not to mention that Iran's inflation is skyrocketing. 


Radio Farda reported that "with food prices rising at a double-digit monthly rate in recent months, rising costs have put even more pressure on the household budgets of Iranians living on the minimum wage."


This has led to sporadic protests, which have been linked to the tough economic situation and have been led by truck drivers, farmers, workers, merchants and teachers, occasionally resulting in violent confrontations with security forces.


Iran's economy has faced instability in recent months with the national currency, the rial, fluctuating in value, making it difficult for ordinary people to make ends meet.


It has been predicted that least 8% economic growth is needed to reduce unemployment woes, and "such growth has not materialized," according to Radio Farda.


Zachary Keyser contributed to this report.


Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

April 19, 2019
Egypt to vote on constitutional amendments amid fairness and transparency

By MINA NADER/THE MEDIA LINE