Saudi prince criticizes Iran deal

"If Iran has the ability to enrich uranium to whatever level, it's not just Saudi Arabia that's going to ask for that."

By REUTERS
March 16, 2015 08:50
1 minute read.
Saudi Arabia

Prince Turki al-Faisal of Saudi Arabia. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

RIYADH - Any terms that world powers grant Iran under a nuclear deal will be sought by Saudi Arabia and other countries, risking wider proliferation of atomic technology, a senior Saudi prince warned on Monday in a BBC interview.

"I've always said whatever comes out of these talks, we will want the same," said Prince Turki al-Faisal, who has previously served as head of Saudi intelligence and Riyadh's ambassador to Washington and London but is no longer a government official.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Saudi Arabia sees Iran as its main regional rival and fears that an atomic deal would leave the door open to Tehran gaining a nuclear weapon, or would ease political pressure on it, giving it more space to back Arab proxies opposed by Riyadh.

Iran and six world powers known as the P5+1 group are holding talks to reach a deal aimed at assuaging their fears that Tehran is using the fuel enrichment process of its atomic power programme to secretly develop a nuclear weapon.

Tehran denies that charge and wants to lift heavy international sanctions that have been put on its economy.

"If Iran has the ability to enrich uranium to whatever level, it's not just Saudi Arabia that's going to ask for that," the prince was quoted as saying by the BBC.

Although Prince Turki is not a Saudi official, his comments are widely understood to reflect the thinking at senior levels of the Al Saud ruling family.

JPOST VIDEOS THAT MIGHT INTEREST YOU:


"The whole world will be an open door to go that route without any inhibition, and that's my main objection to this P5+1 process," said the prince, who is a brother of Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

An Iranian Officer of Revolutionary Guards with Israel flag drawn on his boots
September 24, 2018
Iran warns Israel and U.S. to expect 'devastating' revenge

By REUTERS, JPOST.COM STAFF