‘Child allotment cuts hurting large families’

Poor families with many children have seen a 25 percent decrease in their monthly income since cuts in child allotments went into effect last month.

By
September 30, 2013 01:39
A child playing in Lod

Lod child playing 370. (photo credit: Ouria Tadmor)

Poor families with many children have seen a 25 percent decrease in their monthly income since cuts in child allotments went into effect last month, according to a National Insurance Institute study.

The report, based on data collected from internal NII files, shows that the cuts, which had been decided upon by the Treasury earlier this year, have greatly harmed such families.

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The greatest impact was noted among families for whom NII benefits constitute a significant part of the monthly income.

The data revealed that the percentage of families with neither parent earning a salary increases with the number of children.

Approximately 25% of families with six or more children have no earners, while among families with two children, the rate stands at 8%. In total, roughly 9.6% of families with children do not include breadwinners.

The proportion of families whose total income remains below the minimum wage increases with the number of children, the data demonstrates.

According to the report, some 10% of families with children receive disability benefits and other forms of income support from the NII.


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