Jerusalem College of Technology receives approval to expand campus 

The Tal Campus for Women will provide opportunities for students from underserved populations to pursue higher education.

 Students are seen at the Jerusalem College of Technology. (photo credit: JERUSALEM COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY)
Students are seen at the Jerusalem College of Technology.
(photo credit: JERUSALEM COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY)

The Jerusalem College of Technology (JCT) announced on Thursday that it has received approval from the Israel Land Authority to significantly expand the college’s grounds through the construction of the Tal Campus for Women.

The expansion of JCT — home to some 5,000 students from religious backgrounds — aligns with the broader plans spearheaded by the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage to position the capital as a national hub for academic excellence in science, technology, and other disciplines.

 The new Tal Campus will provide increased opportunities for national religious, Haredi, and Ethiopian women to pursue higher education and attain quality employment in scientific and high-tech industries.

Prof. Chaim Sukenik, President of JCT; Rabbi Yosef Zvi Rimon, Rabbinic Head; Minister Ze'ev Elkin; Moshe Lion, Mayor of Jerusalem and Stuart Hershkowitz (credit: AVI HAYUN)Prof. Chaim Sukenik, President of JCT; Rabbi Yosef Zvi Rimon, Rabbinic Head; Minister Ze'ev Elkin; Moshe Lion, Mayor of Jerusalem and Stuart Hershkowitz (credit: AVI HAYUN)

“Promoting technology education in Jerusalem and attracting students to this discipline is a significant goal for the city,” said Minister of Housing and Construction Ze'ev Elkin, who heads the Israel Land Authority as well as the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage. “Under my leadership, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage will continue to invest its resources in academics and ensure that students from all walks of life are properly integrated into higher education and the job market.”

The Tal Campus construction project, which made significant strides despite COVID-19, is on track to break ground early this year.

The current Tal Campus accommodates some 2,000 women studying at JCT, including 500 from the Haredi community. After completion of the new Tal Campus, JCT expects to increase by 50% the number of students on campus and double its current physical space. The new Tal Campus will also enable the opening of a new industrial engineering and management track for Haredi women.

 “As the second-largest academic institution in Jerusalem, JCT’s rapid development is a necessity,” said Uriel Ben-Nun, the College’s Vice President of Construction and Infrastructure. The Israel Land Authority’s approval will bring this expansion to fruition, and we hope to break ground on the new Tal Campus soon.”

 JCT’s academic programs for women have produced job placement rates of over 90 percent for Haredim and other underserved students, with alums securing immediate employment upon graduation in leading firms such as Intel, Texas Instruments, Check Point, and IBM.