'Hydro-diplomacy:' A new frontier for Israel-Morocco ties

Water security will be a topic at this year's Global Investment Forum in Marrakech

 From right to left. Energy and Water Minister Karin Elharrar, Mekorot Chairman Yitzhak Aharonovich, Finance Minister Avigdor Lieberman, Jerusalem Mayor Moshe Lion, Mekorot CEO Amit Lang, and project head Miki Elisha (photo credit: MEKOROT)
From right to left. Energy and Water Minister Karin Elharrar, Mekorot Chairman Yitzhak Aharonovich, Finance Minister Avigdor Lieberman, Jerusalem Mayor Moshe Lion, Mekorot CEO Amit Lang, and project head Miki Elisha
(photo credit: MEKOROT)

For the first few decades of Israel's history, water scarcity was one of the core challenges that the Jewish state had to face. 

Today, Israel is one of the world’s leaders in water technologies, reusing nearly 90% of its wastewater, and producing almost 80% of its drinking water through desalination plants. The expertise of Israel’s research centers and companies can offer a unique contribution to its partners and allies.

For Morocco, water stress has become an increasingly alarming problem. 

Earlier this year, Minister of Equipment and Water Nizar Baraka warned that by 2050, the country will lose 30% of its water resources. To address the issue, Baraka emphasized the need for “hydro-diplomacy.” 

At the beginning of this year, the Moroccan government allocated $260 million dollars for its 2021-2022 water emergency plan, as reported by the Morocco World News. At the same time, the country’s leaders called for more structural actions to tackle the issue, such as updating irrigation systems and water infrastructure. In addition, Morocco is already building what it claims to be the world’s largest desalination plant near Casablanca. 

By 2030, the country aims at establishing 20 desalinations plants.

Water technologies have been one of the main areas of cooperation between Jerusalem and Rabat since the establishment of the Abraham Accords.

ISRAEL NOW produces more fresh water than it consumes (Pictured: Barn swallow drinks water in the Negev). (Credit: Flash90)ISRAEL NOW produces more fresh water than it consumes (Pictured: Barn swallow drinks water in the Negev). (Credit: Flash90)

Since 2020, the two nations have signed several memorandums of understanding, including around water. In addition, agreements have also been stipulated between Israeli and Moroccan academic institutions, including the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and Mohammed VI Polytechnic University (UM6P) – one of Morocco’s leading technical universities. Water research and technologies feature prominently among the topics at the core of the cooperation.

Water innovation will also be at the center of the upcoming Global Investment Forum organized by the Jerusalem Post and its media partners – Global Media Holdings in Morocco and the Khaleej Times in the United Arab Emirates. The Forum will take place in Marrakech on November 16-17.

Learn more here.

To discuss a VIP ticket or sponsorship, email Jerusalem Post Head of Conferences Maayan Hoffman at [email protected].