Pritzker Prize-winning architect Richard Rogers dies at 88

Rogers' architectural background includes the 3 World Trade Center in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Millennium Dome in London.

 Architect Richard Rogers poses inside an elevator in the Lloyd's building in London. (photo credit: REUTERS/SUZANNE PLUNKETT)
Architect Richard Rogers poses inside an elevator in the Lloyd's building in London.
(photo credit: REUTERS/SUZANNE PLUNKETT)

Richard Rogers, a British-Italian Pritzker Prize-winning architect of Jewish descent, passed away in his home in London at the age of 88 on Saturday evening.

Rogers received the Pritzker Prize, also known as the Nobel Prize of Architecture, in 2007. He was also awarded the Royal Gold Medal in 1985 and the American Institute of Architect's Gold Medal in 2019.

His architectural achievements include the 3 World Trade Center in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Millennium Dome in London.

Born in Italy in 1933, he moved to England with his family at age six, later studying in the US. 

Upon his return to the UK much later, he started an architecture studio with a few colleagues, including well-known English architect and designer Norman Foster.

 A general view of the Millennium Dome in London.  (credit: REUTERS) A general view of the Millennium Dome in London. (credit: REUTERS)

Rogers' firm, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, stated upon the news of their former colleague's death that he was "gregarious, always completely free of status, always inclusive, always exploring and looking ahead." It was only last year that Rogers stepped down as chairman of his firm, according to a report by Dezeen.

Queen Elizabeth II knighted Rogers in 1991; he was made a life peer of the Labour Party five years later.