Antimicrobial technologies boom during COVID-19, IDTechex finds

Humanity is seeking new ways to coat surfaces to eliminate bacteria and viruses, the antimicrobial tech industry grows as never before.

A DISPENSING chemist prepares drugs for a chemotherapy treatment in a sterile room at Antoine- Lacassagne Cancer Center in Nice, France, in 2012 (photo credit: ERIC GAILLARD/REUTERS)
A DISPENSING chemist prepares drugs for a chemotherapy treatment in a sterile room at Antoine- Lacassagne Cancer Center in Nice, France, in 2012
(photo credit: ERIC GAILLARD/REUTERS)
COVID-19 led to a spike of interest in antimicrobial technology across many industries, a new study by IDTechex found.
While hospitals had been interested in bacteria-killing paints or additives that can be introduced to sheets to make them hygienic even before the pandemic, the new focus is expected to reach the food, transport, and construction sectors as well.
Reducing bacteria would reduce food contamination, public transportation health concerns and even improve air quality in office and living spaces. 
These goals can be attained by five key technologies: Silver, copper, zinc, silane compounds and titanium dioxide. It is also possible to use naturally produced antimicrobials such as enzymes and dyes found in nature.
Roughly 100 firms are currently working on innovative antimicrobial products, the report argued.