'Bazaar' for looted Ukrainian property allegedly opened in Belarus

The Ukrainian military has repeatedly claimed that looting has been a persistent problem during the war.  

 A woman stands near a building damaged during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the besieged southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 3, 2022. (photo credit: REUTERS/ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO)
A woman stands near a building damaged during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the besieged southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 3, 2022.
(photo credit: REUTERS/ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO)

Russian troops have opened a "bazaar" in Belarus to trade and sell property looted during the invasion of Ukraine, the Ukrainian Intelligence Directorate (GUR) alleged on Saturday.

The looted items trade post in Narovlya includes "washing machines and dishwashers, refrigerators, jewelry, cars, bicycles, motorcycles, dishes, carpets, works of art, children's toys, cosmetics," claimed GUR.

Soldiers are allegedly trying to sell looted items for dollars and euros, but Belarusians are reportedly hesitant due to local restrictions on currency circulation.

GUR claimed that Russian troops have created a convoy system for looting foods using military trucks. Some loot is also allegedly being sent by soldiers home to Russian package delivery services.

The Ukrainian military has repeatedly claimed that looting has been a persistent problem during the war.  

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko gestures at a map which seems to represent the Russian invasion of Ukraine at a meeting of the Belarusian Security Council (credit: Screenshot/Video from Press Service of the President of the Republic of Belarus)Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko gestures at a map which seems to represent the Russian invasion of Ukraine at a meeting of the Belarusian Security Council (credit: Screenshot/Video from Press Service of the President of the Republic of Belarus)

Russian Col.-Gen. Mikhail Mizintsev claimed in a March 26 statement that Ukrainian battalions have been staging videos depicting war crimes in Ukraine, such as looting of local shops, Russian media outlet TASS reported.

Ukrainian Minister of Digital Transformation Mikhail Fedorov called for citizens to help identify looters on a dedicated government Telegram channel, Ukraine Pravda reported on Monday evening.

They robbed and killed civilians in Bucha, Irpen, Gostomel… and then sent all the loot to their families," said Fedorov. "Their faces were captured by a camera in the delivery service office in Belarus. Most of these killers have already been found by artificial intelligence. Hundreds more photos and videos with faces are currently being processed."

The Ukrainian Defense Ministry also opened a website on March 9 allowing Ukrainians to report war crimes, including looting.

Looting and pillaging during war is considered prohibited by the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949. Most state militaries have rules against pillaging, and it has become a norm in customary international law.