Russia restocks on artillery that can shoot chemical, nuclear shells - state media

"The main advantage of this weapon is the ability to use concrete-piercing and chemical shells, as well as special munitions with a nuclear charge," said Russian state media.

 A Russian Nona-SVK self-propelled artillery gun is seen during the International Army Games 2021 outside Moscow, Russia August 24, 2021 (photo credit: REUTERS/MAXIM SHEMETOV)
A Russian Nona-SVK self-propelled artillery gun is seen during the International Army Games 2021 outside Moscow, Russia August 24, 2021
(photo credit: REUTERS/MAXIM SHEMETOV)

The Russian military received a batch of overhauled and modernized self-propelled artillery guns that Russian state media made a special note on Wednesday can be used to launch chemical and nuclear shells.

The Uraltransmash shipped new versions of the Soviet-era 2S7 Pion guns to the Russian military ahead of schedule as part of a 2022 order, RIA reported. 

RIA said that the 2S7M Malka "can fire high-explosive fragmentation projectiles, as well as active-rocket ammunition. The main advantage of this weapon is the ability to use concrete-piercing and chemical shells, as well as special munitions with a nuclear charge."

Dmitry Semizorov, General Director of Uraltransmash, also said that the "modernization has improved all the main characteristics, including maneuverability, mobility, command controllability," according to RIA.

The Russian military has been using the Malka self-propelled gun to bombard Ukraine since the beginning of the war. 

 A man looks at Russian military equipment destroyed by the Armed Forces of Ukraine displayed, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Prague, Czech Republic, July 11, 2022. (credit: REUTERS/DAVID W CERNY) A man looks at Russian military equipment destroyed by the Armed Forces of Ukraine displayed, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Prague, Czech Republic, July 11, 2022. (credit: REUTERS/DAVID W CERNY)
Concerns over tactical nuclear weapons

Russian state media's note of the artillery for weapons of mass destruction comes as fears rise that Russia may use tactical nuclear weapons to stave off Ukrainian military momentum. 

Putin's Chechen strongman Ramzan Kadyrov has called for Moscow to use low-yield nuclear weapons.

"More drastic measures should be taken, right up to the declaration of martial law at the border areas and the use of low-yield nuclear weapons," said Kadyrov.