Russia should use advanced weapons in Ukraine, Shoigu says

Putin's right-hand man expressed belief that the strongest weapons should be used in the war with Ukraine.

 A Russian Yars intercontinental ballistic missile is launched during the exercises by nuclear forces in an unknown location in Russia, in this still image taken from video released February 19, 2022. (photo credit: Russian Defence Ministry/Handout via REUTERS)
A Russian Yars intercontinental ballistic missile is launched during the exercises by nuclear forces in an unknown location in Russia, in this still image taken from video released February 19, 2022.
(photo credit: Russian Defence Ministry/Handout via REUTERS)

Russia's defense minister said on Wednesday that the armed forces should use new advanced weapons systems in the conflict in Ukraine.

"It is necessary to continue the modernization and creation of promising systems with their subsequent use during the special military operation," Sergei Shoigu said at a defense ministry meeting of senior generals.

Vague descriptions of weapons

Shoigu, one of President Vladimir Putin's closest allies, did not specify which advanced weapons should be used, though he said he wanted to discuss with the generals new ways of improving artillery and missile attacks.

"New ways of using them in combat are being tested," Shoigu said, without giving specifics.

 Civilians who volunteered to join the Territorial Defense Forces train on weapons, following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in Odessa, Ukraine, March 7, 2022. (credit: ALEXANDROS AVRAMIDIS/REUTERS) Civilians who volunteered to join the Territorial Defense Forces train on weapons, following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in Odessa, Ukraine, March 7, 2022. (credit: ALEXANDROS AVRAMIDIS/REUTERS)

In Ukraine, Shoigu said, counter-battery fire was being improved by using long-range rocket systems such as Tornado-S and high-power "Malka" artillery systems.

"This makes it possible to effectively hit foreign rocket and artillery systems," Shoigu said. His comments were shown on state television.

The conflict in Ukraine, likely the deadliest in Europe since World War Two, has killed tens of thousands on both sides and raised fears of a much broader conflict between the US-led NATO alliance and Russia.