First time: National Insurance Institute buys works of disabled artists

“I hope a day will come in which all government offices will display art made by people with disabilities,” one artist said.

A painting by the disabled artist 'Alon', thanks to him, the NII will buy art made by disabled people (photo credit: Courtesy)
A painting by the disabled artist 'Alon', thanks to him, the NII will buy art made by disabled people
(photo credit: Courtesy)
The National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) will purchase and display artworks made by disabled people, the portal Shavim (Equal) reported on Tuesday, following efforts by activist and Maariv reporter Josh Aronson.
Aronson was contacted by a disabled artist who wondered why is it that, when he visits the offices of the NII to get his affairs in order, he never sees art made by people such as himself. Aronson suggested the idea to NII Director General Meir Shpigler and was delighted to get a call from NII vice-head of logistics Rekad Kheredin. Kheredin was supportive of the idea and the artist soon got a phone call inquiring about possible sales.
“I hope a day will come in which all government offices will display art made by people with disabilities,” the artist, who wished to use the alias Alon, told the portal.
“All my paintings are like my own children, so I am very excited to present them to the public visiting NII offices.”
Aronson told The Jerusalem Post that, as someone who is on the autism spectrum, he sees the move by NII as “an important move towards equality and openness.”
He joined Alon in calling on “all government agencies to hang pictures by people with disabilities.”   
Shavim is an NGO devoted to promote the rights of Israel’s 1.5 million people with disabilities.  
Disabled artists left a mark on the world of culture with works by painter Frida Kahlo, cartoonist John Callahan, and Turner prize nominee Ángela de la Cruz.
 


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