‘Encourage installation of new safety systems in cars,' expert tells transport minister

Shimon Sudai, chairman of the Association of Transportation Safety Officers In Israel, told Transport Minister Merav Michaeli that two main issues have to be addressed to reduce road deaths.

 TRAFFIC JAMS on the Ayalon highway in Tel Aviv. (photo credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)
TRAFFIC JAMS on the Ayalon highway in Tel Aviv.
(photo credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)

As part of the Transportation Ministry’s master plan to cut road deaths, the public should be encouraged to install safety systems in their cars, an industry expert told Transportation Minister Merav Michaeli.

Shimon Sudai, chairman of the Association of Transportation Safety Officers In Israel, told Michaeli at a recent Knesset committee meeting that two main issues have to be addressed to reduce deaths on the road.

The first is to reduce distractions, which can be prevented by installing safety systems in used vehicles, along with providing tax benefits for the import of such systems. There also needs to be investment in technological improvements that would reduce the human factor in car crashes.

Sudai also said there needs to be a reduction in taxation and costs of safety systems for heavy vehicles, which is the responsibility of the Transportation and Finance ministries.

Transportation Minister Merav Michaeli at a briefing to reporters, October 11, 2021. (credit: SHLOMI COHEN/GPO)Transportation Minister Merav Michaeli at a briefing to reporters, October 11, 2021. (credit: SHLOMI COHEN/GPO)

Some of the systems on the market include DMS (Driver monitoring systems), BSD (blind spot detection) and BSIS (blind spot information systems).

“The technology exists, and the products are available,” Sudai said. “All that is left is to make decisions under the authority of the minister... in order to advance their installation process.”