Netanyahu: Ultra-Orthodox, Smotrich 'do whatever I say'

Where else would he pull mandates from? Ultra-Orthodox parties, and the Religious Zionist party, all of whom do "whatever I want."

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Health Minister Yuli Edelstein seen during the vaccination of the two million recipients, in Ramla, January 14, 2021.  (photo credit: TOMER NEUBERG/FLASH90)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Health Minister Yuli Edelstein seen during the vaccination of the two million recipients, in Ramla, January 14, 2021.
(photo credit: TOMER NEUBERG/FLASH90)
Hours after Netanyahu put his efforts into pulling in as many Arab votes as he could, he set a new target: Ani Shulman, a new party representing the interests of Israel's self-employed.
In his efforts to assure the group that it is worth it to join his coalition, he said that the other groups expected to join his coalition, the ultra-Orthodox parties, and the Religious Zionist Party of Bezalel Smotrich "do whatever I say," in a leaked video obtained exclusively by N12.
Ani Shulman was founded in 2019, and today holds over 200,000 self-employed Israelis.
Netanyahu reportedly offered Ani Shulman head Abir Kara a prominent position in the Likud. When Kara refused, the meeting, which was leaked, was called.
They might join with Naftali Bennett's Yamina, or even form their own party, ahead of a coalition majority of 61 needed for the upcoming March elections.
When Netanyahu was asked by the group how these elections would be different when it comes to representing their interests, he responded, "Who is playing with you? Am I playing with you? Did I not help you? I almost completely sacrificed my political career to help you, not twice, not three times, but four times.
"I come from you, I understand you," he added.
Among their demands were a refund for business taxes and tending to those who didn't receive the coronavirus stimulus package.
Netanyahu cast the blame on other figures, including legal assistants and former Likud MK Moshe Kahlon. Kahlon had previously served as Finance Minister.
In trying to woo the Ani Shulman vote, Netanyahu discussed his political vision for the coalition win: without the figures he ran with before, but running off of the success of his handling of the coronavirus.
"I have one thing different this time [this election]: the coronavirus," he said.
He warned that, should they not join him, they are endangering the unity of the 61 majority that he is convinced he'll get, endangering the coalition.
He told them that he reckons he could pull 41 mandates from support for his coronavirus management, as well as from Arab voters, something he attempted to do on Wednesday in Nazareth, breaking headlines for the protests against his visit.
Where else would he pull mandates from? Ultra-Orthodox parties, and the Religious Zionist party, all of whom do "whatever I want."
The Ani Shulman representatives insisted that they have certain demands that don't require a coalition to enact immediately.

Jerusalem Post Staff contributed to this report.