Why is an organization spreading puzzle pieces across TA's Rabin Square?

"The First Social Puzzle," will be held on Sunday and Monday to raise money for ALUT's annual fundraiser.

Migrants assemble a puzzle depicting Italy on a map, at a makeshift camp in Via Cupa (Gloomy Street) in downtown Rome, Italy, August 2, 2016 (photo credit: REUTERS/MAX ROSSI)
Migrants assemble a puzzle depicting Italy on a map, at a makeshift camp in Via Cupa (Gloomy Street) in downtown Rome, Italy, August 2, 2016
(photo credit: REUTERS/MAX ROSSI)
The Israeli Society for Children and Adults with Autism (ALUT) is asking Tel Aviv to come together for a Herculean task: solving a 300-square meter puzzle.
ALUT wants to see the successful assimilation of children and adults with autism into society. By inviting the public and individuals with autism to work together, ALUT hopes to create both a physical puzzle and a metaphoric one.
"The puzzle is meant to drive home the message that children and adults with autism should be integrated in society," ALUT wrote in a statement. "It also reflects their unrelenting yearning to be part of the human puzzle, contributing their special shape and color to it."
Musician Aviv Geffen holds a "piece of the puzzle" as part of ALUT's project (Ezra Levy)Musician Aviv Geffen holds a "piece of the puzzle" as part of ALUT's project (Ezra Levy)
"The First Social Puzzle" will be held on Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., and Monday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Rabin Square. The event is intended to raise money for ALUT's annual fundraiser.
Recruiting the help of some notable individuals, ALUT has been photographing celebrities holding a puzzle piece that reads "I too am a piece of the puzzle." Meshi Kleinstein, Aviv Geffen, Shani Klein and others will come out to Rabin Square to join the project.
ALUT even wrangled the superstar of the puzzle-building world. Yaron Sharpstein, who holds a Guinness record for completing a 32,356-piece puzzle, will be in attendance as well.
"ALUT is calling upon the public, adults and children alike, to pitch in in putting the pieces together with children on the autistic spectrum and their families, illustrating the magnificence of humanity, which is made up of distinct pieces locking in perfectly with other pieces," the organization wrote in a statement.