Lizzo quickly rereleases 'Grrrls' after receiving backlash for ableist language

“Grrrls,” American artist Lizzo’s new single, has been re-released after sparking a social-media backlash by Lizzo's fans for using ableist language. Fans have asked Lizzo to “do better.”

 Lizzo arrives at the In America: An Anthology of Fashion themed Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York, US, May 2, 2022. (photo credit: REUTERS/ANDREW KELLY)
Lizzo arrives at the In America: An Anthology of Fashion themed Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York, US, May 2, 2022.
(photo credit: REUTERS/ANDREW KELLY)

“Grrrls,” American artist Lizzo’s new single, has been re-released after sparking a social-media backlash by Lizzo's fans for using ableist language. Fans have asked Lizzo to “do better.”

The issue was with the word "spaz," seen as an offensive slur towards those with cerebral palsy. Lizzo released a statement on her Instagram account shortly after the backlash broke out: “Let me make one thing clear: I never want to promote [the] derogatory language.” 

“Let me make one thing clear: I never want to promote [the] derogatory language.”

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Twitter user, Barbara Corfield expressed her concerns about Lizzos new song: “So, the body-positive @lizzo has decided to use the derogative slur word 'spaz' in her new song. An offensive slur which was used against those with cerebral palsy.”

While other users feel the opposite and that Lizzo wasn’t using the term “spaz” in relation to cerebral palsy or any other disability, but that she was referring to the word, as freaking out. Listeners are using this as an excuse “white people are just trying to bring the black artist down.”

What about other artists?

Lizzo had a few fans come to her rescue, by stating that Kanye West also used “spaz” in “FourFivesSeconds,” “Then I heard you were talkin' trash (I'm on a mystery), Hold me back, I'm 'bout to spaz.” 

Just two months ago, Cardi B was featured in Kay Flock’s new single “ Shake it”, which she explicated rapped “You crazy? B****, I'm retarded (retarded).”

This is an ableist slur that did not receive backlash, unlike Lizzo, who felt extremely sorry, and stated in her Instagram post: “As an influential artist I’m dedicated to being part of the change I’ve been waiting to see in the world.”