Israeli-made drones to assist in Norwegian rescue missions in the Arctic

Their state-of-the-art capabilities mean that the drones can continuously fly for hours on end over difficult terrain and identify targets under extreme conditions.

A drone produced by Atlas Dynamics, during a flight test in freezing conditions (photo credit: ATLAS DYNAMICS)
A drone produced by Atlas Dynamics, during a flight test in freezing conditions
(photo credit: ATLAS DYNAMICS)
Israeli-made drones will take part in rescue missions in glaciers and fjords in the Arctic Circle of northern Norway. After going through various flight tests last year, the drones were approved for participating in the rescue missions by Norwegian Search and Rescue Service, the world’s leading arctic rescue unit.
Produced by Atlas Dynamics, the drones are equipped with technology that allows them to operate in freezing conditions. Their unique aerodynamic structure allows them to fly for long periods of time without recharging, while the artificial intelligence and decentralized communications systems that they contain allow them to fly as an independent swarm, far away from any human operator.
Their state-of-the-art capabilities mean that the drones can fly continuously for hours on end over difficult terrain, identify targets under extreme conditions, and transfer all information to rescuers in real time.
The Israeli drones will serve the Norwegian Search and Rescue Service, comprised of over 10,000 rescuers who are called for urgent rescue missions on a daily basis.
Norwegian rescuers are trained for search and rescue operations throughout the Arctic Circle in terrains characterized by steep mountains, glaciers and deep fjords which are often nearly inaccessible.
Every year, rescuers go on countless searches for hikers who do not accurately assess trails or who get stuck in extreme weather conditions, like blizzards. Until today, such operations required rescue helicopters.
The new drones will allow for quicker response times and will cover a wider area in order to swiftly locate and provide initial contact and assistance to those who need it.
The Israeli tech was chosen by the Norwegians after exploring various options, mostly because of its sensory system and operational capabilities in freezing conditions.
Atlas Dynamics and the Norwegian Search and Rescue Service announced that they plan to continue collaboration during the upcoming year for the development of more products that will help with rescue missions next winter.
Established in 2016 by Ivan Tolchinsky, Omri Cherni and Guy Cherni, Atlas Dynamics develops and produces industrial drones and portable docking platforms. The company has offices in Tel Aviv, Bristol, Maryland and Riga.