Start-up raises funds for new multipurpose VR gaming chair

The release of such a versatile product is very timely, as it coincides when so many people are confined to their homes due to the widespread outbreak of COVID-19.

Children using virtual reality technology to learn about Jewish culture  (photo credit: Courtesy)
Children using virtual reality technology to learn about Jewish culture
(photo credit: Courtesy)
Virtual reality start-up Roto VR has raised £1.5 million (NIS 6,701,178) in funding for their new 360 degree gaming chair, making VR more accessible as more and more people are confined to their homes during the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, Techchrunch reported.
The motorized chair is compatible with most existing VR head-mounted displays as well as with all movies and games, and a number of peripheral controllers such as racing wheels. Furthermore, its auto-rotational feature allows the chair to move where the user looks, allowing full 360-degree viewing.
In addition, the chair can also be used for 360-degree desktop computing, with the built-in desktop supporting keyboard and mouse input.
“Most people sit down to watch movies, work, play games and browse the internet whilst seated and we see no reason why the exciting new medium of VR will be any different,” said Roto VR founder Elliot Myers, according to Techchrunch.
The chair is due for an imminent release for both consumers and offices, and will also be marketed to movie theaters and arcades.
The release of such a versatile product is very timely, as it coincides when so many people are confined to their homes due to the widespread outbreak of COVID-19.
In such a crisis, more and more people are turning to video games as a means of escape.
However, many in the games industry have also tried to give back to their players and use in-game social interaction features to foster a sense of community a time where physical social interaction is all but impossible.
This initiative, called the #PlayApartTogether campaign, was started by 18 industry leaders including Activision Blizzard, Glu Mobile, Riot Games and the Israel-based mobile gaming company Playtika. These companies work to provide incentives for in-game social interaction as well as help raise awareness of the World Health Organization's guidelines to prevent the spread of coronavirus.