Virtual pilgrimage to Jerusalem, global prayer session takes place today

Participants can share written prayers that will be placed in the cracks of the Western Wall.

Christians at the annual Jerusalem March on Thurday, September 27th, 2018. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)
Christians at the annual Jerusalem March on Thurday, September 27th, 2018.
(photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)
Thousands of people from across the world will embark together on a virtual pilgrimage to Jerusalem on Saturday, as part of a first-ever grassroots initiative launched by the Genesis 123 Foundation.
Called the Global Prayer for Israel and Virtual Pilgrimage, the initiative will see countless people from around the world, some of whom from countries without diplomatic ties to the Jewish state, gather in an online event to pray. Participants will also share written prayers that will be placed in the cracks of the Western Wall.
The event is set to coincide with the end of the Sukkot holiday. 

Normally, Jews from across the world gather in Jerusalem for Sukkot, as the holiday is known for being one of the three holidays in which one should travel to Jerusalem for prayers and, in biblical times, offerings at the Temple. However, due to the coronavirus pandemic, such in person pilgrimages were limited, if not outright impossible.

This new initiative allows both Jews and Christians to celebrate together.
 “This is the first time that Jews and Christians can celebrate this festival together virtually, from all the corners of the world,” Genesis 123 Foundation president Jonathan Feldstein said in a statement.
Not only will some participants come from countries without ties to Israel, but some, who are Christian, will be from countries where their religion is either not tolerated or could put them in serious danger should they worship openly.
Included in this event are notable Christian leaders, as well as a lineup of top Jewish participants.
“We cannot forget that Jesus was an observant Jew in the Land who celebrated the pilgrimage festivals, and worshiped and preached in the Temple,” Feldstein said. “Understanding what the festivals mean to Jews adds another dimension for Christians in how Jesus lived and their own faith.”
The multilingual event began in Australia and lasts 12 hours until it ends in Alaska.
Registration is free. It can be done here.