Saudi Arabia accuses Muslim Brotherhood of working with the Nazis

n a speech to delegates at the 37th World Zionist Congress in Jerusalem in 2015, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew a great deal of criticism after claiming this exact theory.

German Fuhrer Adolph Hitler doing a Nazi salute (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)
German Fuhrer Adolph Hitler doing a Nazi salute
(photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)
Saudi Arabia claimed on Tuesday that Muslim brotherhood founder Hassan Al-Bana has worked for the Nazis in the past, according to Washington D.C.-Based Middle East Media Research Institute, MEMRI.
As a part of an ongoing escalation between Saudi Arabia and The Muslim brotherhood, the Saudi media has made several attempts to go against the organization.
In this instance, the Saudi government's daily newspaper 'Okaz' published an article titled "The Nazi Brotherhood" according to which the founder of the movement, as well the Jerusalem mufti Haj Amin Al-Husseini had ties to Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party during World War 2.
According to the article, Al-Bana served the Nazis in order to advance the Muslim Brotherhood political goals, with Al-Husseini connecting between the parties. The article also mentioned that the two served as spies for the Third Reich while collaborating with the British intelligence, as well as recruiting soldiers to serve in Hitler's army.

"Muslim Brotherhood founder Hassan Al-Bana maintained secret ties with several foreign intelligence apparatuses, with the aim of [gaining] support for his political agendas, of taking power [in Egypt], increasing the scope of his influence, and realizing his political ambitions as part of [the plan to] establish [the MB as] the Islamic Leadership of the World," the article stated.
The article also focused on the ties between Al-Husseini and the Nazi movement: "Muhammad Amin Al-Husseini, the mufti of Jerusalem and the MB representative in Palestine, was the liaison who managed the recruitment of the Arabs to fight under the flag of the Nazi army."
In a speech to delegates at the 37th World Zionist Congress in Jerusalem in 2015, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew a great deal of criticism after claiming that Hitler's original intentions were solely to expel the Jews, saying the Mufti of Jerusalem changed his mind.
According to Netanyahu's speech, the Fuhrer changed his mind at the insistence of the Palestinian leader at the time, Jerusalem Mufti Haj Amin al-Husseini, who argued that the expulsion of the Jews would result in their arrival en masse to Palestine, which at the time was under British Mandatory rule.