Uri Geller claims ship in Suez Canal was moved by mind power

To release the ship, the famous mentalist is suggesting the world work together and will the ship free with their minds.

Israeli psychic Uri Geller poses for photographers in Cologne (photo credit: REUTERS/INA FASSBENDER)
Israeli psychic Uri Geller poses for photographers in Cologne
(photo credit: REUTERS/INA FASSBENDER)
Renowned Israeli illusionist Uri Geller is urging the world to use mind power to dislodge the Ever Given shipping vessel from the Suez Canal, where it has been sitting jammed for almost a week now.
The 400 meter (430 yard) long Ever Given became wedged diagonally across a southern section of the canal amid high winds early on Tuesday, blocking one of the world's busiest waterways.
To release the ship, Geller is suggesting the world work together and will the ship free with their minds.
The illusionist has been instructing his followers to focus on moving the Ever Given at the same time everyday - at 11:11.
In numerology, the time 11:11 is believed to hold spiritual significance. Many will make a wish or hold a prayer at that minute, as it is seen as an auspicious moment.
The showman claims that the world's collective mind power - not the 14 tug boats attempting to dislodge the ship - already moved it "a bit."
"Keep up the good work. Focus every day at 11:11 am and 11:11 pm send your energy to free the ship. Help the tug boats too," Geller wrote on Twitter.

Efforts to dislodge the giant container ship blocking the Suez Canal have allowed its stern and rudder to move, but it remains unclear when the vessel will be refloated, the head of the canal authority said on Saturday.
A combination of dredging material from around the ship and pulling and pushing the vessel with tugboats made minor progress in dislodging the ship on Saturday, two SCA sources said. One source said there had been some movement at the bow of the ship.
About 15% of world shipping traffic transits the canal and hundreds of vessels are waiting to pass once the blockage has been cleared.
Dredgers removed some 20,000 tonnes of sand from around its bow by Friday. A Dutch firm working to free the vessel said it could be freed by the start of next week if heavier tugboats, dredging and a high tide succeed in dislodging it.
Tugging attempts restarted on Saturday afternoon and further efforts were planned for Sunday, SCA sources said, though they added more sand may need to be removed from around the ship to free it.

Reuters contributed to this report.