Aurora chaser captures incredible footage of Northern Lights

Many of Ledvina's tweets sees him positioning his camera to capture the lights, then fast-forwarding the footage to show its movements quicker.

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of a volcano in Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland, April 22, 2010 (photo credit: REUTERS)
The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of a volcano in Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland, April 22, 2010
(photo credit: REUTERS)

Vincent Ledvina, who describes himself as "The Aurora Guy," posted on Twitter footage he captured of an aurora explosion near his Airbnb in Iceland.

"It was amazing to see in person, the camera doesn't do it justice," he tweeted.

Ledvina, who is also a photographer, often posts on social media footage he captures of northern lights. Many of his tweets see him positioning his camera to capture the lights, then fast-forwarding the footage to show its movements quicker.

What is this phenomenon?

Northern lights, also formally called aurora borealis, is a phenomenon that occurs in Earth's atmosphere where green, red or purple lights dance across the sky.

The Northern Lights above the Kirkenes Snow Hotel (credit: PR)The Northern Lights above the Kirkenes Snow Hotel (credit: PR)

These lights can be found in the northern and southern hemispheres. The southern lights are referred to as aurora australis, according to The Library of Congress's website.

Where can I see them?

They are more likely to be found closer to Earth's poles. In other words, places like Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Antarctica and Iceland. Ledvina is based in Alaska.