Workers find bourbon, newspaper hidden in Confederate statue

Davis, a one time US senator, became president of the Confederate States of America after the South seceded from the Union, starting the Civil War.

A caged statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis is strapped to a truck after being removed from the state capital in Frankfort, Kentucky, U.S. June 13, 2020. (photo credit: BRYAN WOOLSTON/REUTERS)
A caged statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis is strapped to a truck after being removed from the state capital in Frankfort, Kentucky, U.S. June 13, 2020.
(photo credit: BRYAN WOOLSTON/REUTERS)
Workers removing a statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis in the Kentucky state capitol in Frankfurt on Saturday were surprised to find a bottle of bourbon hidden in the base alongside other artifacts, the New York Post reported.
The statue, which was erected on October 20, 1936, was removed after an overwhelming majority of Kentucky's Historic Properties Advisory Commission voted in favor of doing so. Its removal comes in the wake of widespread protests against racism in the wake of George Floyd's death, and has seen many Confederate monuments vandalized or even toppled.
Davis, a one time US senator, became president of the Confederate States of America after the South seceded from the Union, starting the Civil War. Though Davis was indicted for treason, he was never tried.
“When I see the Jefferson Davis statue in my state Capitol, and knowing our history, I can’t find a lot of reasons to honor this man in that way,” commissioner member Cathy Thomas said at the time, according to the New York Post, adding that he “enslaved human beings” and “rebelled against the United States of America.”
When the workers removed the statue, however, they found hidden inside the base a bottle of Glenmore Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, as well as a copy of the State Journal newspaper from the day the statue was erected.
The statue will be relocated to the Davis historical site in his birthplace of Fairview, Kentucky, according to local reports.