J.K. Rowling defends decision to oppose cultural boycott of Israel

"Sharing of art and literature across borders constitutes an immense power for good in this world," says "Harry Potter" author.

By JTA, JPOST.COM STAFF
October 27, 2015 08:26
1 minute read.
Author J.K. Rowling in London November 9, 2013

Author J.K. Rowling in London November 9, 2013. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

J.K. Rowling has defended her decision to oppose a cultural boycott of Israel in a post on her Twitter account.

The Harry Potter author was criticized by a number of her fans on social media after she was announced as one of the 150 British artists who signed an open letter, published by The Guardian last week, espousing the value of cultural engagement with the Jewish state over a cultural boycott.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


On Monday, Rowling addressed “a number of readers asking for more information about why I am not joining a cultural boycott of Israel,” stating that she had “never heard of a cultural boycott ending a bloody and prolonged conflict.”

Rowling argued on Twitter that the impact of a cultural boycott would be felt predominantly by ordinary Israelis and not by the Israeli administration who would be able to affect change, writing that she has “deplored most of Mr Netanyahu’s actions in office,” referring to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

“The sharing of art and literature across borders constitutes an immense power for good in this world,” Rowling concluded. “At a time when the stigmatisation of religions and ethnicities seems to be on the rise, I believe strongly that cultural dialogue and collaboration is more important than ever before and that cultural boycotts are divisive, discriminatory and counter-productive.”

A week after Rowling joined another 150 people from the British arts world in signing a letter published in The Guardian that condemned the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, more than 300 scholars affiliated with British academic institutions signed a letter in the same publication pledging not to cooperate with Israeli academic institutions.

Related Content

A member of Palestinian security forces gestures as a fuel tanker arrives at Kerem Shalom crossing
August 16, 2018
Israel reopens Gaza’s Kerem Shalom crossing: A premature move?

By TERRANCE J. MINTNER/THE MEDIA LINE