Berlin police search for Russian artist

Russian Jewish artist Anna Mikhalchuk disappeared a week ago.

By
March 31, 2008 10:29

 
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Berlin police launched an intense search over the weekend, dragging a lake and combing gardens with sniffer dogs, in the hope of finding Russian Jewish artist Anna Mikhalchuk, who disappeared a week ago. Spokesman Bernhard Schodrowski said divers searched a lake near Anna Mikhalchuk's home, and more than 80 officers with sniffer dogs swept through nearby gardens and along train tracks over several hours. He said efforts to find Mikhalchuk, 52, would continue. Also known in Russia by the name Anna Alchuk, Mikhalchuk left her apartment on March 21 and has not been seen since. She moved to Berlin with her husband, Michail Ryklin, in November 2007. In 2005, she was acquitted by a Moscow court on charges of inciting religious hatred for her works in a controversial art exhibit condemned by the Russian Orthodox Church. The 2003 exhibit - titled "Caution, Religion" - was organized by the Sakharov Museum, which promotes democracy and human rights in Russia.

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