Dance Review: Ido Tadmor

In the solo sections of PUDRA, Tadmor often crossed the line into pathos, perhaps because he truly tries to share several unfiltered biographical stations of his life without distancing himself from his stage persona.

By ORA BRAFMAN
February 27, 2010 17:58
2 minute read.
Electric. JVC's 'Yesterday.

dance theater 311. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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Ido Tadmor
PUDRA
Haifa, February 23

Dancer/choreographer Ido Tadmor inhabits a unique place in the local dance field. Tadmor retains ballet oriented, stylized moves and centered body, traits that are perceived as mannerisms and largely rejected and hardly ever used by his contemporaries.

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Tadmor is also endowed with enormous charisma as a performer and an overdeveloped self awareness to boot, which produces a measure of discomfort and drives away a portion of avid dance audiences. People either adore him or dislike him, but no one can remain indifferent. I can’t think of any other male dancer in the past 20 years who has had a similar effect, or caused similar involvement. Perhaps one can label it as star quality.

Tadmor’s greatest assets throughout his performing years were his virtuosic, pedantic technique and his highly expressive presentation. But when sadness, loneliness, longing or solitude is expressed, pathos is only one step away.

In the solo sections of PUDRA, Tadmor often crossed the line into pathos, perhaps because he truly tries to share several unfiltered biographical stations of his life without distancing himself from his stage persona.

Since closing down his company several years ago, Tadmor has had a highly successful career as a full time celebrity, heading the jury on dance reality programs, entering into fashion, and getting attention in heaps. But now he wants back, to be a player in the arena he had left.

PUDRA starts as a studio scene, showing that he still can stretch his legs higher, keep his splits longer and look all-together gorgeous. Two mirrors that follow him around prove it to him and to us all the time.



He shares his affair with the fashion world, and misses a chance to lighten up some. After all no one really forced him to put the makeup on.

On recent Curtain Up events, he took part as guest dancer with choreographer Anat Gregorio and dancer Yoni Sutchi. Gregorio’s work served as a good experience and Tadmor wisely invited her creation to be a part of his evening. The piece is well constructed, and Tadmor toned himself down a little, which did him good. The artistic dialogue and interaction with both his partners produced the best moments of the evening.

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