Coming distractions

By ARYEH DEAN COHEN
February 19, 2009 10:09
1 minute read.

 
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While it's unclear just what the next reality mega-hit will be, a look at some of the current reality shows making waves in the US could hold some definite ideas, perhaps even posing some guest roles for local politicians. Here are some of them, all real shows currently either on the air or in production in the US or elsewhere: The Secret Millionaire: Each week, a different millionaire leaves his or her luxury life behind to live in a deprived neighborhood to try to improve things, without being able to use his financial advantages to his benefit. While doing so, they try to find deserving individuals to bond with to help make a difference. Are you listening, Arkadi Gaydamak? The Baby Borrowers: Five couples aged 18-20 who are considering having children are given a little taste of it first. They are given a three-day-old infant, a toddler, a pre-teen, a teenager and then an elderly person to take care of for 72 hours each, so they can understand the responsibility and challenges of parenting more fully. Still want to get engaged so young, kids? The Principal's Office: The blurb says: "Watch as these brave administrators listen, nurture and dispense justice in that feared and most respected of all rooms - the principal's office." OK, maybe that one won't work here, although we can definitely see a spot for Education Minister Yuli Tamir. Seventeen Kids and Counting Make that 18: The Duggar family from Arkansas has that many kids, and this show attempts to present just how they manage. The blurb says Jim Bob and Michelle firmly believe that every child is a gift to be cherished. No mention of whether they have a family still in the backyard. We're not sure a documentary on a haredi or other similar family hasn't been done here already, but this one sounds like a natural for us. And put down Huggies and Materna as sponsors right away. Momma's Boys: "Who is really the most important woman in every man's life?" That's the question posed here, where a group of three bachelors must choose from 32 single women, who ultimately must please their mothers. Yes, women of Israel, we hear you - been there, done that.

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