Easter is my favorite time of year. Colorful blossoms replace dead trees and bright sunshine overtakes dark winter days bringing forth renewed life. I just returned from a family vacation for Easter break that encompassed all of that newness. Easter represents more than bunnies, baskets and colorful eggs. Easter is about hope. It celebrates life over death. It is a Christian’s most Holy day of the year, just as Passover is the most Holy week for the Jews. Have you ever wondered how both Jews and Christians worship the same God and believe in the same old testament scriptures, yet do not celebrate the same religious holidays?  In historical terms, Passover is just as important as Easter and represents the same principle … life! My Pastor recently spoke about the rituals of Passover. I was captivated by the service, especially in light of my blog in which I focus so heavily on the red door in the Lego movie that was touched by the one who consequently became the Special. I referenced the significance of “the door” as mentioned in the New Testament, but I had not even considered how it relates to the days of Moses when he approaches pharaoh to release his people for three days for a feast in the wilderness. When Pharaoh refused, God unleashed the plagues on the Egyptians, culminating in the slaying of every firstborn son by an avenging angel. The Israelites mark the door frames of their homes with lamb’s blood so that the angel will recognize and “pass over” each Jewish household.

 

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In the Lego movie, after Emmet touches the door, He becomes the “Special” who ultimately sacrifices his life to save his friends and fellow citizens from all over the world.  However, before he could become this sacrifice, he had to prove himself worthy.  It is understood in the movie that most of the citizens were waiting on someone who could fulfill this role and some were hoping it would be them. Emmet’s fellow citizens were skeptical of his chosen status as he did not exemplify their perceived idea of the Special.  But as time went on, Emmet proved himself uniquely qualified as he slowly and sheepishly unleashed what was inside of him.



 

One of Emmet’s fellow citizens named Vitruvius, who looks like the ancient prophet, foreknew the virtues of the Special spoken of in the prophecy. He was willing to testify for Emmet if he did indeed prove to posses the powers of the Special. Vitruvius played a critical role in revealing Emmet’s identity to the citizens of Bricksville and unveiling the path to Emmet’s destiny and ultimate purpose.  I liken Vitruvius to someone named John the Baptist, a man of the wilderness, much like Elijah (1 Kings 17). who lived on locusts and honey.

 

There came a man who was sent from God, his name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light … The one born of God. The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. … I myself did not know him, but the reason I came ... was that he might be revealed to Israel.”  [John 1:31]  
A
bout him (Yeshua), John said "Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”

 

He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; he was led like a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before its shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth. … Yet it was the LORD's will to crush him and cause him to suffer, and though the LORD makes his life an offering for sin, he will see his offspring and prolong his days, and the will of the LORD will prosper in his hand.

[Isaiah 53:7,10]

 

Perhaps we should be more like Isaac who spoke up and said to his father Abraham, "Father?" "Yes, my son?" Abraham replied. "The fire and wood are here," Isaac said, "but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?" [Genesis 22:7]

Perhaps the hidden piece of matzo or the colored Easter egg is for us, God’s children, to find the prize which He has waiting for us through the open door.
 


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