Decline in migration under Trump could quickly reverse, history shows

By REUTERS
March 11, 2017 03:47
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Last month's 40 percent decline in migrant detentions along the southern US border represents a victory for US President Donald Trump, but may prove short-lived unless he follows through with his hard-line vows, past experience shows.

Trump's administration on Wednesday trumpeted the February decline as evidence its executive orders on immigration were working, fulfilling his promise to crush illegal migration.

But an analysis of recent US apprehension data, along with interviews with migrants, diplomats and activists, suggests peoples' fears will subside if Trump fails to realize his tough policies, causing the flow to rise.

"Right now, nobody wants to go" to the United States, said Victoria Cordova, who along with her daughter Genesis, was part of the first group of mothers and children deported by plane from the United States to Honduras in 2014.

"If in the future the situation looks better, well, I imagine then people will be more willing to travel."

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