Dead Sea area rocked by earthquake

There were no injuries or damage reported.

By JTA/MARCY OSTER
June 27, 2019 06:11
1 minute read.
A seismograph records volcanic activity in Indonesia's North Sumatra province Sept. 2010

A seismograph records volcanic activity in Indonesia's North Sumatra province Sept. 2010. (photo credit: REUTERS/TANAH KARO)

 
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JERUSALEM (JTA) — An earthquake measuring 3.8 on the Richter Scale was felt in the area of the Dead Sea.

The epicenter of the temblor that took place early on Wednesday afternoon was Ein Bokek in southern Israel, according to Israel’s Geophysical Institute.



There were no injuries or damage reported.



The Dead Sea Rift is a series of faults that run from southeastern Turkey to the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula.



In May, an earthquake centered about 125 miles off the coast of the Mediterranean Sea between the northern Israeli cities of Haifa and Hadera measured 4.5 on the Richter Scale.



Last July, a swarm of more than a dozen small but noticeable earthquakes shook northern Israel near the Sea of Galilee. At least four measured higher than 4 on the Richter scale, with some felt as far away as Jerusalem. A similar swarm occurred in 2013.



Experts have warned that a large earthquake could strike Israel in the coming years. Israeli officials have warned that the country is not prepared for such a natural disaster.

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