Nobel laureates call for end to TV's 'Stars Earn Stripes'

By REUTERS
August 14, 2012 00:31
1 minute read.

 
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LOS ANGELES - Nine Nobel Peace laureates, including retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, on Monday called on television network NBC to cancel its "Stars Earn Stripes" reality show, labeling it a bid to "sanitize war by likening it to an athletic competition."

The competition show, due to air for the first time on Monday evening, puts eight celebrities such as singer Nick Lachey and politician Sarah Palin's husband Todd, through military-style training, including helicopter drops and long-range weapons firing.

The celebrities are paired with former members of the US Marines, Green Berets and other forces to compete for a cash prize that would go to a charity of their choice. Producers say the show, hosted by retired US Gen. Wesley Clark, will "pay homage to the men and women who serve in the US armed forces."

But in an open letter to NBC Entertainment Chairman Bob Greenblatt, the Nobel prize winners said that "preparing for war is neither amusing nor entertaining.

"It is our belief that this program pays homage to no one anywhere and continues and expands on an inglorious tradition of glorifying war and armed violence.

"Real war is down in the dirt deadly. People - military and civilians - die in ways that are anything but entertaining," the letter added.

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