Market Wise

Zoglobek has mounted a NIS 6m. multimedia campaign to promote its pastrami range of cold cuts.

By
January 8, 2009 08:01
3 minute read.

 
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THE INTANGIBLE commodity that is increasingly being marketed across Israel at the moment is goodwill. Wherever one turns, business enterprises, organizations, institutions and individuals are engaged in a wide range of goodwill acts to help people living within a 40-kilometer range of Kassam and Grad rockets. Aware that many providers of goods and services in southern areas are suffering greatly because they have had to suspend their enterprises in response to the security situation, Beitili, which has large expanses of space in its branches throughout the country, is offering small businesses affected by the situation the opportunity to temporarily relocate free of charge. Beitili said it would not take any rent for space occupied by businesses such as hairdressers, clothing and household utensil stores. Moreover, the chain is asking its regular clients to come and patronize such businesses so that proprietors can continue to provide for their families without having to resort to charity. Beitili CEO Avi Cohen says the chain can absorb dozens of businesses for a limited period in its 14 branches, and is even willing to give space to competitors selling merchandise similar to that sold at Beitili. ALTHOUGH REAL estate is currently in the doldrums, not only in Israel but around the globe, Gindi Holdings believes that what goes around comes around. Although there is not much market demand right now, the situation will eventually improve. So rather than suspend activities, they have gone ahead with their plans to open an extraordinarily attractive sales complex for their Gindi Boulevard project in Petah Tikva. Inspired by traditional Japanese architecture, the office stands over organic pools of water and was constructed at a cost of NIS 4.5 million. The philosophy behind the sales complex is to give prospective buyers the feeling of being in a resort village where there is little pressure and everything is relaxed. Gindi Investments is a family business headed by Lital Gindi Matalon, along with Avi, Guy and Roi Gindi. INSTANT MEALS have been around for a long time, and come in categories of "heat and eat," add boiling water or simmer for three to 10 minutes. It's all child's play for busy people who haven't got time to cook or for people without culinary talents. Nutritionists warn that many such products contain additives and preservatives, which are not exactly beneficial to our health. This has prompted Osem to come out with a new line of almost-instant soups featuring the "natural triangle" on the label. This indicates that the products are nutritious and free of monosodium glutamate, artificial coloring or preservatives. To make the public aware of these soups, Osem, via Gitam/BBDO, is launching a NIS 3.5m. advertising campaign. ZOGLOBEK HAS mounted a NIS 6m. multimedia campaign to promote its pastrami range of cold cuts. THEY MAKE them tall in a Belarus - at least the boys in blue who serve in the country's police force. When a 13-member contingent from the Belarus Police arrived at Tel Aviv's Marina Hotel, it was discovered that the standard Israeli bed, which is 1.90 meters long, was too short for them. The hotel had to bring in beds that were 2.40 m. in length because the shortest member of the delegation was 2 m. tall. The Marina is now ready to accept a visiting basketball team. In fact, more than 20 years ago, Edna Kissman, an Israeli public relations executive then living in New York and working for Burson Masteller, one of the leading PR firms in the Big Apple, was given the assignment of promoting a hotel that had once been a major-league establishment, had deteriorated to the extent of being run-down and had been recently renovated. It really had nothing going for it, so Kissman suggested to management that all the rooms be furnished with extra-long beds so that basketball players and other athletes could have a good night's sleep. It proved to be a perfect sales pitch, and it may conceivably work for the Marina as well.

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