Two ancient former synagogues destroyed in Poland and Ukraine

Local authorities and conservation activists failed to register the building in Poland as an architectural monument.

By MARCY OSTER/JTA
May 13, 2019 04:22
1 minute read.
Archeological sites in Israel

The synagogue at the archeological site of ancient Sussiya.. (photo credit: MEITAL SHARABI)

 
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(JTA) — Two ancient former synagogues were destroyed in Poland and in Ukraine.

The 16th-century former synagogue of Pidhaitsy, a town in the Ukraine’s west, collapsed on Saturday night as a result of heavy rains and neglect that eroded one of its supporting pillars, the news website te.20mimut reported.



In Poland, building contractors demolished the century-old former synagogue of Nowy Targ south of Krakow, Gazeta Krakowska reported on Friday.



The demolition was conducted legally because local authorities and conservation activists had failed to register the building as an architectural monument, the newspaper reported.



The Nazis destroyed the synagogue’s interior during the Holocaust and the Polish communist authorities turned into a workshop. It was restituted to the Jewish Community of Krakow, which sold it. The building was not registered as a monument during the time that it was owned by the Jewish community, according to Gazeta Krakowska.



Declaring a building as a monument significantly reduces its worth on the real-estate market.



Tadeusz Jakubowicz, the head of the Jewish Community of Krakow, did not reply to multiple requests for comment from the newspaper.

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